ESTERNO NOTTE, THE FICTION THAT DOESN’T PERSUATE IN THE DESCRIPTION OF A MORO WITHOUT LOVE FOR DC.

In Bellocchio’s work a clearly inadequate Christian Democrat party emerges. Whoever condemns it, from the prison of the people, is precisely its President. And yet, we should always recognize in Moro’s words a coherent and continuous incitement to continue the party’s commitment to the consolidation and growth of democracy in Italy.

Artistic freedom is not in question. Even less in the face of a superlative acting test such as that of some actors, starting with the extraordinary Fabrizio Gifuni. Having said that, I take the liberty of proposing a critical observation on the work of director Marco Bellocchio. I do it only because in recent months I have been working on a book, which will be published at the beginning of next year (it will be the forty-fifth anniversary of the assassination of the DC President), in which I analyze and comment on Moro’s last two public speeches, held in 1977 in front of the Christian Democrat audiences of Mantua and Benevento.

In Bellocchio’s work a clearly inadequate Christian Democrat party emerges, led by a weak and inept secretary, by a psychopathic Minister of the Interior, by a Prime Minister – according to a by now consolidated cliché – glacial and cynical. And, overall, a picture that offers us the idea, as Lucio D’Ubaldo rightly wrote here, of “a power in a confused state”.

It is to this very negative profile that Moro inevitably turns from prison, with his letters. This is what the director indicates to us, who further explains his idea of ​​him in the President’s last conversation with a priest, in which he accuses his party mates and above all, with very harsh words, Andreotti. Now, I don’t allow myself to evaluate even a second of the dramatic 55 days lived in captivity by a man deprived of his freedom. Everything could have happened during that inhuman constraint.

I remain with what the party president said in his last speeches to the Christian Democrats, in that terrible 1977, during which the Red Brigades organized his kidnapping. In other words, what Aldo Moro said in his heartfelt speech to the Chamber of Deputies in defense of party comrade Luigi Gui and for the transfer of all Christian Democracy. All words of support and closeness to the DC and its leaders, and even more to its militants. Not even vaguely a hint of criticism and much less hostile or vicious towards anyone. On the contrary, a coherent and continuous encouragement to continue the party’s commitment to the consolidation and growth of democracy in Italy.

“What interests me is to recall, in this moment of political and civil struggle, the face of Christian Democracy… What comforts me in our daily toil, dear friends? It is having behind us 14 million votes, 14 million people… If I have reasons, many, for concern, at least this comforts me: that we are still together, many of us, wanting freedom for our country!”.

Words, the latter, pronounced at the end of the speech in Benevento. Four months before the kidnapping.

ESTERNO NOTTE, THE FICTION THAT DOESN’T PERSUATE IN THE DESCRIPTION OF A MORO WITHOUT LOVE FOR DC.