Letters to the Editor—August 20, 2022

The problem: Bui Van Phu, who was initially released without bail after assaulting a man in the street.

Everything you need to know about the insane depths to which New York’s criminal justice system has sunk can be found in the story of the convicted sex offender who was first freed without bail after violently smashing the head of a pedestrian (“Travesty,” Aug. 19).

The victim suffers in the hospital from a fractured skull, a fractured cheekbone and bleeding in the brain.

A Bronx judge has allowed the district attorney to reduce an attempted murder charge to assault and harassment, offenses that are not eligible for bail.

The blood of this innocent victim, like the rivers of blood of other victimized New Yorkers, is in the hands of Governor Hochul and the legislative leaders whose senseless and horrific policies without bail are sowing violence, chaos and fear in our streets.

Marc E. Kasowitz

manhattan

With dismay, I read about another senseless act of violence by a psychopath who shouldn’t be allowed to be on the streets.

Apparently, there is no limit to the number of casualties we suffer because the Democrats in Albany refuse to obey the will of the people. The Democratic Party is truly the party of crime.

saul michael

brooklyn

It was with complete disbelief that I read that this dangerous individual had once again been allowed to walk the streets.

The victim is in a coma and suffers from head trauma. If he survives, he will likely be hospitalized for life. In addition, he will receive a hospital bill for the first hospital treatment he receives. After that, he will be alone.

Citizens of this city, this state and this country – this November, you better vote like your life depends on it, because it really does.

These defenders of criminals must be removed from office. Let them take the same risks that are offered to us, the unsuspecting workers. And no more police protection phalanxes. Already enough.

S. Kane

brooklyn

The Bronx district attorney’s decision to reduce charges against the madman who placed an innocent man in a coma with a brain hemorrhage and a fractured skull, from attempted murder to misdemeanor assault, is truly mind-boggling.

It goes beyond incompetence and points to a more nefarious motive of the supposed “attorney” representing the most criminal borough in a city struggling with a major crime epidemic.

This threat must be eliminated from society immediately and those responsible for the decision to release him should themselves be put on trial for needlessly endangering the lives of the citizens they are sworn to protect.

Thomas Urban

Wantagh

Convicted sex offender Bui Van Phu viciously punched his reckless victim – which led to him being hospitalized and requiring corrective surgery – and received incredibly lenient treatment from the system. justice “. His charge of “attempted murder” was reduced, so as to compel him to be freed without bail.

What a perfect distillation of the absolute madness of New York’s “no bail” law. It should have been called the “Criminal Permissive Relief Act of 2021”.

How much longer must society be in danger, while the list of innocent victims deprived of justice continues to grow?

Richard D. Wilkins

Syracuse

Given the current guidelines without consequences, it is foreseeable that criminal behavior will continue unabated in New York.

A recent victim is in a coma after sustaining a brain injury, resulting from unexpected weight from a career criminal who enjoyed freedom and roamed the streets.

For years, it was a principle that fear of punishment affected the decision to commit a criminal act. This is not the case today.

This state of criminality will continue unless the legislature rescinds the imposed directives affecting the judiciary and the police.

John Gargiulo

White stone

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Letters to the Editor—August 20, 2022 – CNET