The ‘Terminator’ Alliance

Politicians are liars and traitors. But they consider that these defects are in them virtues. And it is true that no politician will get far without knowing how to lie or being willing to betray. Seen like this, It could be said that Pedro Sánchez is a great politician, the best, since he lies and betrays better than anyone. However, as with other virtues, excess becomes a defect. Sánchez lies so much that nobody trusts him anymore, which prevents him from reaching any agreement that has to be based on good faith. And he has betrayed so many that no collaborator is totally loyal to him for fear of being the next victim.

In general, it could be thought that so much excess in lies and betrayal is the consequence of the foolish effort of a proud and vain fool to stand out by being a liar and traitor on as many occasions as they present themselves and not only when strictly necessary. But it’s not that. Or at least it’s not just that. There is more. It is one thing to be willing to betray the Civil Guard and cede its presence in Navarra in exchange for the necessary votes to carry out a law and quite another to do so in exchange for others that are not essential. It is one thing to be willing to legalize coups in exchange for the approval of one’s budgets, and quite another to do so despite not needing the collaboration of that party, nor is it necessary to approve the budgets themselves, which They could perfectly have been extended. The question therefore is not that they are very fat betrayals, but that they are unnecessary. And, even if the traitor did not consider them serious, it turns out that the electorate does and perhaps they will make them pay at the polls. Committing a betrayal may make sense, but committing it while being unnecessary and electorally detrimental is completely lacking.

So many lies and so much unnecessary betrayal and contrary to the electoral interests of Pedro Sánchez make us think. It does not seem that the president is a psychopath who likes to do evil as an end in himself, nor a hooligan who brings evil to others for the fun of it, for laughing at those he mistreats. And, even if it were so, it would be necessary to explain why his party consents to it. It seems more that the alliance that Sánchez’s PSOE has sealed with those who want to destroy the unity of Spain is not circumstantial, but strategic, destined to last long beyond this legislature. Perhaps it is based on the conviction that the left is no longer capable of reaching the necessary majorities to govern if it is not in union with the nationalists, with whom, however, it can gather a sociological majority that, duly united and sufficiently disciplined when it comes to voting, will always win the right. If all this apparent irrationality were a consequence of this alliance, the PSOE would have to remain faithful to it even at times like today when it is not essential to carry out a certain law. As one can see, the result is not Frankenstein, it’s more like the Terminator.

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The ‘Terminator’ Alliance